Kauai Island Excursion part 2

Today we will explore the south and the west of Kauai. You can look forward to a bunch of different highlights. So make yourself comfortable and enjoy reading.

Digital StillCamera

Wailua River

Wailua River and surroundings

The Wailua River is the only river on the Hawaiian Islands, where ships can be used. If you are more of an active person you can book a guided canoe tour. For all of you that think this is too strenuous there are boat rides that go upstream to the Fern Grotto. During this ride you will have comments about the river and it’s surroundings.

Digital StillCamera

Fern Grotto

The Fern Grotto is remarkable because of the Ferns that grow on the ceiling and which are due to gravity hanging from it. What you won’t see and what you even can’t reach with your canoe are the Wailua Falls. Therefore I would suggest to spend a day hiking in Wailua State Park. Apart from a tropical rainforest you can explore quite a few sacred places of the ancient Hawaiians. The Kamokila Hawaiian Village  is a good starting point to explore this natural preserve. Beginning with a temple and ending with huts where the Polynesian people lived before the Europeans came, there is a whole village to explore and you will get a good impression of life in the old days. There is a nature trail that explains everything. Once you have visited the village you can go on a tour with an Outrigger Canoe, hiking or swimming. As mentioned before Kauai is called the Garden Isle and most attractions have a nature theme.

Digital StillCamera

Wailua State Park

Digital StillCamera

Wailua State Park

Lihue, the capital of Kauai

Leaving Wailua you will soon arrive in Lihue. The town itself is not very interesting. Hanamaulu Bay offers a swimmable beach, but the airport is rather close here. Kalapaki Beach is also a swimmable beach and apart from a few shops and bars you will find the Kauai Beach Marriott here. The hotel is not very inviting seen from the outside, but the interior is just beautiful. The most remarkable part of the hotel is the large pool in form of a hibiscus flower.

Digital StillCamera

Plumeria

An excursion into the world of legends

From the Nawiliwili Harbor, where you can sometimes see cruise ships, you will access the  Huleia National Wildlife Refuge. Part of this Park is the  Alekoko Fish Pond. The old Polynesians have a legend concerning this pond. Long before the Polynesians there were people living on the islands: the Menehune. These small people grew only to be 2,5ft. high, but possessed supernatural strenghts. They are very shy and so there aren’t many people that have actually seen them. When the chief of the Polynesians decided to built this new pond he went to the Menehune and asked them for help. They agreed to bulit it in one night, but insisted that no one would watch them doing it. The chief gladly accepted and so on the next full moon the Menehune started their task. A Hawaiian prince and his princess had a date the very same night and when they heard the noise of the construction going on they decided to sneak to the site and watch. Of course they were found and the Menehune ended their work instantly. The pond was only finished many years later by Asian plantation workers. As for the two lovers, they were punished by being transformed into rocks which can still be seen in the hills next to the pond.

Digital StillCamera

Kilohana Plantation railway

Kilohana Plantation

When we continue we will reach Kilohana Plantation. The name of it translates to „Place not to be missed“. The plantation home can be visited and offers a good sight into the life of the rich that were living here in the old days. A part of the house is nowadays the home of one of the best restaurants on Kauai. Gaylords at Kilohana offers fine dining at its best with ingredients from Hawaii. If you are lucky enough to get a table in the courtyard you will certainly pass a memorable meal. On the grounds you can also explore a few stores, especially the Koloa Rum Company Store is not to be missed. This the only distillery on the islands that produces rum which actually tastes very good. But the highlight of the plantation is the historical train that runs around the grounds. During the ride you will get more interesting information about the work life on a plantation. If you want to go to a luau I can recommend Kalamaku. Every tuesday and friday night you can experience a great show. Not as authentic as others, but very professionell.

Digital StillCamera

Plumeria

Koloa, Kauai

To reach our next stop it takes only a short drive. Koloa is a small historic village where the plantation workers used to live. You can see one of the oldest sugar mills in Hawaii. The houses are home to a few souvenir shops and galleries. It’s worth a short stroll.

Kauai’s southern coast, Poipu

Poipu on the southern coast is a resort town with a broad selection of mostly luxurious hotels and beautiful beaches. A bit inland there are two small shopping malls. On Mondays and Thursdays afternoon your shopping spree at the Poipu Shopping Village will be accompangied by a free live Hula show. On Wednesdays the Shops at Kukui’ula offer a Culinary Market with live-cooking and tasting. On Friday nights you can listen to Hawaiian musicians playing here. I want to point one shop at Kukui’ula: Lappert’s Hawaii sells very tasty ice cream made of Hawaiian ingredients. Delicious…….

Digital StillCamera

Orchiddengarten in der Kiahuna Plantation

Poipu has pristine beaches, where you can at least most of the time take a swim. But on certain days the currents are too strong for doing it. You have the choice between several bays. Baby Beach is suitable for kids, while Brennecke’s Beach is best for body surfing. The most popular are Poipu Beach and Shipwreck Beach. But only Poipu Beach has a lifeguard on duty. On this beach I had an encounter with a Hawaiian Monk Seal, although I first realized that a bunch of people were tying ropes and therefore cutting off a part of the beach. The conservation of flora and fauna is very important to Hawaiians and a lot of them engage in volunteering. Oh, and I found the seal most impressive.

A bit further west you will find another spouting horn. As I have told you before  you will find these along the coast of the islands. When the tide is high the water is pressed through them and builds fountains.

An impressive natural sight: the Napali Coast

From Poipu we continue to Ele’ele and Hanapepe. The drive leads us through coffee plantations that have replaced the pineapple and sugar cane fields. Hawaiian coffee tastes, due to the volcanic soil, different as any other coffees. It has less acidity, but a very intense taste. My favorite is still the Kona coffee, but I will tell you more about it, when I am writing about the island of Hawaii, also known as the Big Island.

Digital StillCamera

Napali Coast

Hanapepe is the starting point for excursions to one of the most beautiful regions of Kauai, the Napali Coast. This stretch of the coast can only be reached by water or from the air but is for me one of the most stunning coast lines on this planet. I recommend that you book a snorkeling tour to explore it. You’ll have to get up rather early in the morning, but you will be part of an awesome tour. When leaving Hanapepe your catamaran will be guided by dolphins. Apparently the best time to watch those highly intelligent animals is early morning. I am always enraptured by their games. Aboard the ship you will be served breakfast which you can relish in peace, since it’ll take some time before you reach the northern coast. At the turning point you will get a climpse of Ni’ihau, the forbidden island, which can be visited by invitation only. It used to be a plantation, but today it is protected by the owners and they aim to preserve the original Hawaiian culture. On your way back you should have your camera ready. You will have the sun in your back and the perfect light for some great shots of the colorful cliffs. At different locations you can see waterfalls tumbling over high cliffs into the ocean, while on other stretches you will see romantic beaches inviting you for a swim. In my first part of the Kauai excursion I wrote about the Kalalau Trail that runs along this coast. At some point the captain will anchor and you’ll be snorkeling. I never was a big friend of this sport, since all my attempts ended with a feeling that I drank half the ocean. But after the instruction by the crew aboard this catamaran, I was able to snorkel and was delighted. The underwater world off the Hawaiian coast is colorful and offers a broad variety. And if you are lucky you might even swim with a honu (turtle). The best to describe all this is to show you pictures. So here you go:

From Hanapepe we continue a bit further west to Waimea. There is not much to be told about this small town unless you are lookign for a romantic hideaway. The Waimea Plantation Cottages used to be a plantation and the small houses for the employees were turned into vacation homes. On the grounds you will also find a small black beach without lifeguard and in it’s natural state. Something else wouldn’t fit here.

THE highlight of Kauai: Waimea Canyon

One more reason why you should go to Waimea. This is the starting point for our grande finale of our tour around the island. The road is climbing the mountains and will lead you to the rim of  Waimea Canyon. It is the second largest in the US and is also called the Grand Caynon of the Pacific. It is about 10 miles long and up to 3000 feet deep. In contrast to it’s big brother you will see apart from colorful stones a lot of green, since due to the precipitation there are plants growing  in niches and on ledges.

Hiking in Waimea Canyon

There are two different trails you can take to explore the canyon. The short Ililau Trail is a nature path with lots of information about the formation of the canyon plus the flora and fauna of this area. If you hike the Kukui Trail you will descend along the western side about 2000 feet towards the ground. There you can camp overnight, but you will have to get a permission in the park. Since it can get very hot in the canyon you should start your tour early in the morning. And please keep in mind that you will have to climb those 2000 feet again. You will be rewarded with pure nature and fantastic views. And don’t forget to take enough water. There are no possibilities to buy anything on your way.

Digital StillCamera

Napali Coast

If you don’t want to make the descend, there are more trails to be found that’ll bring you to the top of the cliffs of the Napali Coast. And in this part of Kauai you will realize why this island is called the Garden Island.

Before I close my post for today, one more tip. If you like helicopter flights this is the place to treat you to one. This way you will see all this beauty from above. A truly unforgettable event.

Did I give you enough reasons to go to Kauai? Have you been there before and have more recommendations for first timers? I am looking forward to your comments.

Mahalo nui loa for your attention.

Kauai Inselrundfahrt 2. Teil

Heute werden wir den Süden und Westen von Kauai erkunden. Ihr könnt Euch auf eine Menge verschiedener Highlights freuen.

Digital StillCamera

Wailua River

Wailua River und Umgebung

Der Wailua River ist der einzige Fluss Hawaii’s, auf dem Boote fahren können. Für die Aktiveren unter Euch gibt es die Möglichkeit geführte Kanutouren zu machen. Wer es gemütlicher mag, kann mit einem Ausflugsboot bis zur Fern Grotto fahren. Während der Fahrt gibt es dann Informationen zum Fluss und seiner Umgebung.

Digital StillCamera

Fern Grotto

Die Fern Grotto ist deshalb bemerkenswert, weil hier an der Decke Farne wachsen, die aufgrund der Schwerkraft nach unten hängen. Was Ihr aber bei der Bootsfahrt nicht sehen werdet und auch mit dam Kanu nicht erreichen könnt, sind die Wailua Falls. Daher empfiehlt es sich einen Tag mit Wanderungen im Wailua State Park zu verbringen. Hier gibt es neben Regenwald auch viele historische, den Hawaiianern heilige Orte zu erkunden. Das Kamokila Hawaiian Village  ist ein guter Ausgangspunkt um dieses Schutzgebiet zu erkunden. Zunächst könnt Ihr hier ein hawaiianisches Dorf erkunden, das nach historischen Vorgaben wieder aufgebaut wurde. Vom Tempel bis hin zu den Hütten der Ureinwohner, hier könnt Ihr Euch ein Bild davon machen, wie die Menschen hier lebten, bevor die Europäer kamen. Das ganze wird in einem Lehrpfad sehr gut erläutert. Wenn Ihr dann das Dorf gesehen habt, könnt Ihr hier auch Touren mit Outrigger Kanus machen, wandern oder aber auch Schwimmen. Wie bereits erwähnt ist Kauai, die Garteninsel und daher sind die meisten Attraktionen auch im Bereich Natur zu finden.

Digital StillCamera

Wailua State Park

Digital StillCamera

Wailua State Park

Lihue, die Verwaltungshaupstadt von Kauai

Von Wailua kommt Ihr dann zunächst nach Lihue. Kauai’s Verwaltungshauptstadt hat nicht wirklich viel zu bieten. In der Hanamaulu Bay gibt es einen Strand, an dem Ihr schwimmen gehen könnt, allerdings ist hier der Flughafen nicht weit. Am Kalapaki Beach geht das auch. Hier habt Ihr dann auch ein paar Shops und Kneipen und das Kauai Beach Marriott, das von außen nicht besonders einladend ausschaut, aber in der Anlage wirklich wunderschön ist. An diesem Hotel besonders bemerkenswert ist der Pool in Form einer Hibiskusblüte.

Digital StillCamera

Plumeria

Ein Ausflug in die Sagenwelt

Vom Nawiliwili Hafen, in dem auch Kreuzfahrtschiffe fest machen, kommt Ihr zum Huleia National Wildlife Refuge. Ein Teil dieses Schutzgebietes bildet der Alekoko Fish Pond. Zu diesem gibt es eine nette Sage. Auf den hawaiianischen Inseln gab es angeblich vor den Polynesiern schon Menschen. Die wurden Menehune genannt. Diese kleinwüchsigen Menschen werden nur bis zu 80cm groß, verfügen aber über übernatürliche Kräfte. Da sie sehr scheu sind, hat man sie schon lange nicht mehr gesehen. Als der Fish Pond, in dem die Polynesier Fische hielten, um sie bei Bedarf zu fangen, gebaut werden sollte, hat sich der Häuptling des Stammes an die Menehune gewandt und um Hilfe gebeten. Sie versprachen den Teich in nur einer Nacht zu bauen, bestanden aber darauf, dass niemand ihnen dabei zuschaut. Der Häuptling sagte begeistert zu und so machten sich die Menehune beim nächsten Vollmond an die Arbeit. Ein Prinz und eine Prinzessin der Hawaiianer hatten sich aber zu einem Stelldichein verabredet und als sie die Menehune hörten, schlichen Sie sich an die Baustelle heran um den Fortschritt zu beobachten. Natürlich wurden Sie dabei entdeckt und die Menehune brachen die Arbeit am Teich sofort ab und er wurde erst sehr viele Jahre später von asiatischen Plantagenarbeitern vollendet. Das Liebespaar wurde von den Menehune bestraft, indem sie in Felsen verwandelt wurden. Man kann sie heute noch in den Hügeln neben dem Pond erkennen.

Digital StillCamera

Kilohana Plantation railway

Kilohana Plantation

Wenn wir nur weiter fahren kommen wir zur Kilohana Plantation. Der Name dieser Plantage bedeutet übersetzt soviel wie „Ort, den man nicht verpassen sollte.“ Das Gutshaus kann besichtigt werden und vermittelt einen Eindruck des Lebens, das die Reichen hier früher geführt haben. In diesem Haus ist auch eines der besten Restaurants Kauai’s beheimatet. Das Gaylord’s at Kilohana bietet Euch Gourmetküche mit Zutaten aus Hawaii. Und wenn Ihr dann noch im wunderschönen Garten sitzt, steht einem unvergesslichen kulinarischen Erlebnis nichts mehr im Wege. Auf der Plantage gibt es dann noch ein paar Shops, wobei Ihr den Koloa Rum Company Store nicht verpassen solltet. Das ist nämlich der Shop der einzigen Brennerei in Hawaii, die hawaiianischen Rum herstellt. Und der schmeckt auch noch sehr gut. Ein weiteres Highlight der Plantage ist die historische Eisenbahn, die Euch über das Gelände fährt. Während der Fahrt bekommt Ihr dann wieder sehr interessante Informationen zum Leben und Arbeiten auf einer Plantage. Wenn Ihr ein Luau besuchen wollt, kann ich euch das Kalamaku empfehlen. Dienstags und Freitags, erlebt Ihr hier eine Show der Extraklasse. Nicht so autenhtisch wie andere, dafür aber sehr professionell gestaltet.

Digital StillCamera

Plumeria

Koloa, Kauai

Bis zu unserem nächsten Stopp in Koloa ist es nicht mehr weit. Dieses kleine historische Dorf war früher ein Ort, in dem Plantagenarbeiter wohnten. Heute gibt es hier eine der ältesten Zuckermühlen Hawaiis zu sehen. In den historischen Gebäuden sind heute Souvenirshops und Galerien untergebracht. Für einen kurzen Bummel lohnt sich das allemal.

Kauai’s Südküste, Poipu

Poipu an der Südküste ist eine Ansammlung vieler teils sehr luxuriöser Hotels und schöner Strände. Im Landesinneren gibt es zwei kleine Shopping Center. Im Poipu Shopping Village wird der Einkaufsbummel Montags und Donnerstags am Nachmittag von einer Live Hulashow begleitet. In den Shops at Kukui’ula gibt es mittwochs einen Culinary Market mit Live Koch-Show und Verköstigung. Der Freitag Abend gehört dann einheimischen Musikern, die hier kostenlos aufspielen. Ein Laden sei Euch in Kukui’ula aber noch empfohlen. Lappert’s Hawaii macht köstliches Eis mit hawaiianischen Zutaten und nur ausgesuchten Zutaten. Sehr lecker…..

Digital StillCamera

Orchiddengarten in der Kiahuna Plantation

Der Strand in Poipu ist sehr schön und man kann hier auch sehr gut schwimmen. Allerdings gibt es auch hier Tage, an denen die Strömung zu stark dafür ist. Ihr habt die Auswahl zwischen mehreren Buchten. Am Baby Beach können auch Kinder im Meer schwimmen während sich Brennecke’s Beach gut für Body Surfing eignet. Am beliebtesten sind aber Poipu Beach und Shipwreck Beach, wobei Poipu Beach der einzige Strand mit Lifeguards ist. Hier hatte ich dann auch mal das Vergnügen eine der seltenen hawaiianischen Mönchsrobben am Strand zu sehen. Wobei ich zuerst nur bemerkte, dass plötzlich eine Schar von Menschen ein gelbes Band spannte und so Teile des Strandes absperrte. Der Erhalt der Flora und Fauna wird überall in Hawaii als sehr wichtig erachtet und viele Hawaiianer setzen sich in ihrer Freizeit dafür ein. Die Robbe fand ich schon sehr beeindruckend.

Etwas weiter westlich könnt Ihr dann wieder ein Spouting Horn besichtigen. Wie ich Euch ja schon ein paar Mal erzählt habe, gibt es in den Lavafelsen am Strand immer wieder Löcher durch die bei Flut das Wasser in Form einer Fontäne nach oben gedrückt wird.

Beeindruckend Natur: die Napali Coast

Von Poipu fahren wir nun weiter nach Ele’ele und Hanapepe. Die Fahrt führt durch Kaffeeplantagen, die inzwischen an vielen Stellen die Ananas und das Zuckerrohr verdrängt haben. Hawaiianischer Kaffee schmeckt aufgrund des vulkanischen Bodens anders als die Kaffees, die wir kennen. Wenig Säure, dafür aber sehr intensiver Geschmack. Mein Favorit ist aber der Kaffee aus Kona. Dazu dann mehr, wenn ich über Hawaii, the Big Island schreibe.

Digital StillCamera

Napali Coast

Hanapepe ist der Startpunkt für Erkundungen eine der schönsten Regionen Kauais, die Napali Coast. Diese ist nur vom Wasser oder aus der Luft zu erreichen und meiner Meinung nach eine der schönsten Küstenlandschaften, die es auf diesem Planeten gibt. Ich empfehle Euch die Schnorcheltour zu machen. Ihr müsst zwar sehr früh aufstehen um rechtzeitig am Ausgangspunkt zu sein, aber Ihr werdet dafür mit einer traumhaften Tour belohnt. Nach dem Start bin Hanapepe werdet Ihr zunächst von Delfinen begleitet. Am frühen Morgen sind die angeblich am aktivsten und wer ist nicht hingerissen vom Spiel dieser hochintelligenten Tiere. Ihr könnt an Bord frühstücken, denn bis Ihr das Nordende der Küste erreicht habt, vergeht etwas Zeit. Am Wendepunkt der Tour, könnt Ihr dann in der Ferne noch Ni’ihau sehen. Diese kleine Insel wird die Verbotene genannt, weil man sie nur auf Einladung betreten darf. Früher war die ganze Insel eine einzige Plantage, heute steht sie unter besonderem Schutz der Besitzer und hier soll das ursprüngliche hawaiianische Leben und die Kultur erhalten bleiben. Auf dem Rückweg solltet Ihr Eure Kamera griffbereit haben. Ihr habt nun die Sonne im Rücken und könnt so das ganze Schauspiel der bunten Klippen bewundern. An manchen Stellen stürzen sich Wasserfälle über die Klippen ins Meer, an anderen Teilen der Küste laden versteckte romantische Buchten zum Baden ein. Der anfangs beschriebene Kalalau Trail führt Euch an eben dieser Küste entlang. Irgendwann wird dann Euer Boot in einer dieser Buchten ankern und Ihr werdet schnorcheln gehen. Ich habe mich das ja nie so wirklich getraut, weil alle Versuche bis dahin immer damit endeten, dass ich das Gefühl hatte den halben Ozean leer getrunken zu haben. Aber nach der Einweisung durch die Crew an Bord dieses Katamarans, konnte sogar ich schnorcheln und war hell auf begeistert. Die Unterwasserwelt vor Hawaii ist besonders bunt und vielfältig. Und mit etwas Glück schwimmt auch eine Honu (Schildkröte) an Euch vorbei. So wirklich beschreiben können das aber nur Bilder. Eine kleine Auswahl zeige ich Euch hier.

Von Hanapepe fahren wir wieder ein Stück Richtung Westen nach Waimea. Das Örtchen ist eigentlich nicht weiter erwähnenswert, es sei denn Ihr seid auf der Suche nach einem wirklich romantischen Urlaubsort, an dem Ihr ein sehr urspüngliches Hawaii entdecken könnt. Die Waimea Plantation Cottages sind eine ehemalige Plantage und die Häuschen wurden in Ferienappartements umgewandelt. Die Unterkünfte sind einfach, aber hier zählt die Romantik. Zu dem Resort gehört auch ein kleiner schwarzer Strand, ohne Lifeguard und naturbelassen im positiven Sinn. Was anderes würde hier aber auch nicht passen.

Das Highlight Kauai’s: Waimea Canyon

Waimea ist aber auch Ausgangspunkt zum großen Finale der Kauai-Rundfahrt. Von hier geht die Straße in die Berge und bringt Euch an den Rand des Waimea Canyon. Diese Schlucht ist die zweitgrößte der USA und wird auch der Grand Canyon des Pazifik genannt. Er ist ca. 16km lang und bis zu 900m tief. Im Gegensatz zu seinem großen Bruder gibt es hier neben bunten Steinen auch sehr viel Grün zu sehen, da in den Nischen und auf Felsvorsprüngen eben aufgrund des  Regens auch Pflanzen wachsen können.

Wandern im Waimea Canyon

Es gibt zwei Wanderungen, die man hier machen kann. Der kurze Ililau Nature Loop ist ein Lehrpfad auf dem Ihr viel Wissenswertes über die Entstehung des Canyons und die Flora und Fauna erfahrt. Wenn Ihr den Kukui Trail nehmt, wandert Ihr an der Westseite des Canyons etwas über 600 Meter in die Tiefe zum Grund des Canyons. Dort gibt es eine Campingmöglichkeit. Dafür braucht Ihr eine Genehmigung, die Ihr aber im Park bekommt. Da es hier sehr warm werden kann, empfiehlt es sich aber sehr früh am Morgen aufzubrechen. Und denkt daran, dass Ihr die 600 Höhenmeter am Ende wieder hinaufsteigen müsst. Belohnt werdet Ihr mit unberührter Natur und fantastischen Ausblicken. Und vergesst nicht genügend Wasser mitzunehmen. Im Park gibt es nämlich keine Möglichkeiten was zu kaufen.

Digital StillCamera

Napali Coast

Wenn Ihr nicht wirklich in die Tiefe hinab steigen wollt, gibt es hier aber noch weitere Wanderwege, die Euch teilweise an den Rändern der Klippen der Napali Coast entlang führen. In diesem Teil von Kauai wird Euch dann wieder bewusst werden, warum man Kauai die Garteninsel nennt.

Ein besonderer Tipp noch zum Schluss. Wer gerne im Heli fliegt, der sollte sich auf Kauai unbedingt einen Flug gönnen. Ihr werdet dann die Schönheit des Waimea Canyon und der Napali Coast aus der Luft zu sehen bekommen. Das ist wirklich ein unvergessliches Erlebnis.

Habe ich Euch jetzt Lust gemacht auf Kauai? Wart ihr schon mal da und habt noch Anmerkungen zu meinem Post? Ich freue mich immer über Euer Feedback.

Mahalo nui loa für Eure Aufmerksamkeit.

Kauai Island Excursiuon Part I

Today we are going to explore another island.

Deck Chairs in a typical garden

Smith’s Family Garden Luau

Kauai’s nickname ist the Garden Isle and there is a reason for it. Since the mountains on Kauai aren’t as high as on the other islands, the rain is more widely spread. Plus it rains a bit more than on the other islands. But don’t worry, long lasting downpours are rather seldom. On the other hand the region around Mount Wai’ale’ale is one of the wettest on this planet. Weiterlesen

Kauai Inselrundfahrt Teil I

Heute wollen wir eine andere Insel erkunden.

bunte deck chairs auf einem rasen

Deck Chairs im Garten von Smith’s Family Luau, Kauai

Kauai hat den Beinamen die Garteninsel und das zu Recht. Da die Berge auf dieser Insel nicht so hoch sind, kann sich der Regen besser verteilen. Und es regnet hier auch ein bisschen mehr als auf den anderen Inseln. Aber keine Angst, Dauerregen ist auch hier selten ein Thema. Allerdings ist die Region um den höchsten Gipfel Wai’ale’ale eine der regenreichsten der Welt. Weiterlesen

Hawaii – How to get there and general information

view over waikiki and diamond head

View over Waikiki and Diamond Head

I’d recommend to start your Hawaii vacation on Oahu. First of all there are the best flight connections coming from Europe. When you catch an early morning flight leaving Europe direction San Francisco or Los Angeles you should be able to make a connection to Hawaii and arrive in Honolulu in the early evening. This way jetlag isn’t so hard on you. The hotels on the islands are accustomed to receive their guests at the oddest times. To be on the safe side, I would inform my first hotel about the late arrival. This way it’s guaranteed that your room is ready upon arrival. Just send them your flight number and arrival time.

view over Punchbowl Crater and the airport Honolulu

View over Punchbowl Crater and the airport

Weiterlesen

Hawaii-Allgemeine Hinweise

Place of refuge auf Hawaii the big island

Place of refuge, Big Island

Bevor ich die einzelnen Inseln im Detail vorstelle, noch ein paar generelle Hinweise.

Ihr solltet die lange Anreise nicht auf Euch nehmen, um dann nur eine Insel zu besuchen. Das wäre sehr schade. Jede Insel ist anders und fasziniert mit anderen Sehenswürdigkeiten. Ein bisschen helfen die englischen Beinamen, die die Inseln bekommen haben. Oahu heißt „The Gathering Place“ – also Treffpunkt, Kaua’i „The Garden Isle“ – Die Garteninsel, Maui „The Valley Isle“ -die Insel der Täler, Hawaii „The Big Island” – einfch nur groß, Molokai “The Friendly Isle” – die freundliche Insel, Lanai “The Pineapple Isle” – die Ananasinsel und dann gibt es noch Ni’ihau “The Forbidden Island” – die verbotene Insel und Kaho‘olawe „The Target Isle“. Ni’ihau ist in Privatbesitz. Die ehemalige Plantage kann man nur auf Einladung der Besitzer besuchen. Die Plantage ist aufgegeben und heute schottet man sich hauptsächlich deswegen ab, weil man hier auf dieser Insel das ursprüngliche Hawaii mit seiner polynesischen Kultur bewahren will. Kaho`olawe ist deswegen die Target Isle, weil diese Insel lange Zeit von der Air Force als Zielscheibe für den Abwurf von Bomben genutzt wurde. Seit 1950 ist die Insel unbewohnt und befindet sich heute wieder in Privatbesitz. Auch diese Insel darf man nur mit Einladung betreten. Viel zu sehen gibt es hier eh nicht. Die Insel ist sehr trocken, das sie im Windschatten des Haleakala auf Maui liegt und es nur sehr wenig regnet.

Wale vor Maui

Wale vor Maui

Weiterlesen

Hawaii – Anreise und Informationen

Blick auf den Diamond Head

Blick auf den Diamond Head

Mein Tipp ist, eine Hawaii-Reise auf Oahu zu beginnen. Zum einen gibt es hier eine Flugverbindung mit der Star Alliance (Lufthansa, United Airlines), bei der Ihr morgens von Frankfurt nach Los Angeles oder San Francisco fliegen könnt und dann am selben Tag noch weiter nach Honolulu, wo Ihr am frühen Abend ankommt. So ist der Jetlag am leichtesten zu überwinden. Die Hotels auf Hawaii sind darauf eingestellt, dass ihre Gäste zu den unmöglichsten Zeiten landen und wieder abfliegen, aber für die Ankunft würde ich das entsprechende Hotel schon über eine späte Ankunftszeit informieren. Das garantiert, dass Euer Zimmer gehalten wird. Am besten gebt Ihr bei der Hotelbuchung Eure Flugnummer, mit der Ihr in Honolulu landet mit an.

Blic auf den Punchbowl Krater und den Flughafen

Blick auf den Punchbowl Krater und den Flughafen

Weiterlesen

Hawaii – Kulinarisches

Sonnenaufgang am North Shore

Sonnenaufgang am North Shore, Oahu

Die Nahrung der Ureinwohner ist ein weiterer Beweis, dass sie aus dem polynesischen Raum kamen. Auf den Inseln gab es nicht viel Essbares. Abgeschnitten von der Welt hatte sich hier eine Flora und Fauna entwickelt, in der der Mensch nicht vorkam und so musste die Evolution hier auch nichts schaffen, was große Lebewesen ernährte. Da die Seefahrer nicht wussten was sie erwartet, brachten sie Schweine, Bananen, Kokosnüsse und andere Pflanzen und Tiere mit. Das wichtigste Grundnahrungsmittel war Taro, auch als Wasserbrotwurzel bekannt.

Taropflanze

Taropflanze

Weiterlesen

Hawaii Kultur Fortsetzung

Hawai 010

Im polynesischen Hawai’i muss das Leben etwas paradiesisches gehabt haben. Ok, wahrscheinlich nur wenn man der richtigen Klasse angehört hat, aber richtigen Stress kannte man wohl auch nicht. Im Folgenden will ich ein paar kulturelle Aspekte erläutern, die man heutzutage als Tourist in vielen Hotels vorgeführt bekommt, aber den wahren Hintergrund vielleicht nicht immer kennt.

 Lei:

Wie die meisten Traditionen haben die ersten Siedler von den anderen polynesischen Inseln diese Tradition mit hierher gebracht. Diese Kränze werden nicht immer aus Blumen gemacht, sondern auch aus Muscheln, Nüssen, Blättern, Federn, teilweise sogar aus Tierknochen und Zähnen. Jemandem einen Lei zu schenken ist Ausdruck von Ehre, Respekt und ganz viel Aloha. Ein Lei soll übrigens nie den Nacken berühren, sondern nur die Schultern.

Die Blätter des Maile Strauchs wurden für Leis genutzt, die den Adligen vorbehalten waren. Diese endemische Pflanze steht in Verbindung mit Laka, der Göttin des Hula. Im Gegensatz zu den anderen Leis sind diese Leis unten offen und bilden keinen kompletten Kranz. Früher wurden solche Maile Leis als Friedenszeichen zwischen Häuptlingen ausgetauscht. Heute werden diese Leis für besondere Anlässe wie Hochzeiten genutzt.

Besonders schön finde ich die Leis aus Kokui Nüssen. Dieser Baum war den alten Hawaiianern heilig, da das Öl der Früchte für Lampen genutzt werden konnte und so ein wichtiger Teil des täglichen Lebens war. Die Orchideen, die heute für die meisten Leis verwendet werden, kommen zu einem Großteil von den großen Plantagen, die sich hauptsächlich auf Big Island zwischen Hilo und dem Volcanoes Nationalpark finden. Einige davon kann man sogar besichtigen. Viele Hotels bieten als Animationsprogramm einen Kurs an, bei dem man das Herstellen eines Leis lernen kann. Solltet Ihr daran teilnehmen, vergesst also nicht auch ganz viel Aloha mit einzuweben. Denn Liebe und Respekt gibt es auf dieser Welt ja nicht unbedingt im Überfluss.

Digital StillCamera

Digital StillCamera

Hula:

Wie ich ja schon erwähnt habe, wurde der Hula den Hawaiianern vom Gott Lono auf Molokai’i übergeben. In frühen Zeiten war dieser Ausdruckstanz den Männern vorbehalten. Erst mit dem Einzug der Europäer, und hier vor allem den amerikanischen Soldaten, wurde der Hula auch von Frauen getanzt.

In einer Kultur, in der es keine Schrift gibt, müssen andere Wege gefunden werden Traditionen und Legenden weiter gegeben zu werden. Der Hula ist eine Form. Jede Bewegung steht für ein Wort und so können eingeweihte Tänzer mit ihren Tänzen eben Geschichten aus längst vergessenen Tagen wieder aufleben lassen. Oft auch von Gesang begleitet. Touristen erklärt man das gerne mit dem „Hukilau“, einem Lied, in dem beschrieben wird wie die alten Polynesier im Meer oder aber in einem der Fishponds mit Netzen Fische gefangen haben. Dieses Lied wird auch in den meisten Hula-Kursen der Hotels dazu genutzt den Touristen den Hula bei zu bringen. Heute unterscheidet man zwischen dem traditionellen Hula, der sich sehr streng an alte Regeln und Gesetze hält und dem modernen Hula, der mehr Freiheiten genießt und nicht mehr unbedingt nur dem Geschichten erzählen dient. Auch wenn die meisten Hula Shows, die man als Tourist zu sehen bekommt, nicht viel mit dem Original zu tun haben, so finde ich die doch immer wieder sehr schön. Meistens tragen die Tänzer/innen farbenfrohe Gewänder, die Musik ist sehr besänftigend und die Bewegungen strahlen eine Anmut aus, wie ich sie noch selten gesehen habe. Jedes Jahr in der Osterwoche findet in Hilo auf Hawai’i, the Big Island der weltgrößte Wettbewerb für Hula Tänzer statt. Wer dabei sein möchte, muss aber sein Hotel schon mindestens ein Jahr im Voraus reservieren, oder aber morgens von Kona nach Hilo fahren und abends wieder zurück, was aber ganz schön anstrengend ist. Aber auch beim Aloha Festival in Honolulu im September kann man „echten Hula“ sehen.

Ukulele:

Die Ukulele gilt als urhawaiianisches  Instrument. Kaum einer weiß aber, dass diese „kleine Gitarre“ von portugiesischen Plantagenarbeitern auf die Inseln gebracht wurde. Die Hawaiianer haben sie aber schnell für sich entdeckt und in ihrer Musik eingesetzt. Meiner Meinung nach sogar sehr gut. Hawaiianische Musik mag jetzt nicht jedermanns Sache sein, aber ich finde sie sehr toll und besitze auch ne Sammlung an CD’s. Im Sommer auf dem Balkon mit einem Mai Tai in der Hand bringt mich diese Musik immer wieder sofort in mein Paradies.

Wenn wir schon bei der hawaiianischen Musik sind, dann muss ich noch etwas erwähnen, was hawaiianisch ist. Slack Key: Dabei werden die Saiten der Gitarre so lange gelockert, bis alle in einem einzigen Akkord klingen, oder so ähnlich. Ich kann leider nicht Gitarre spielen, daher könnte das jetzt auch nicht so ganz korrekt sein. Aber vielleicht kann ja einer von Euch das besser erklären?

Talk Story:

Eine der Lieblingsbeschäftigungen der Hawaiianer. Was macht man abends am Lagerfeuer, wenn man keinen Fernseher und erst recht kein WLAN hat? Manche von Euch werden sich das nur schwer vorstellen können, aber so lange liegt das nun auch noch nicht zurück. Die alten Polynesier erzählten sich Geschichten und Legenden. Auch hier gilt wieder, ein Volk, das keine Schrift kennt, muss andere Wege finden seine Vergangenheit weiterleben zu lassen. Ein offizielles Treffen beginnt traditionell mit einem besonderen Song, der die Ahnen 1. um ihre Anwesenheit und 2. gleichzeitig um deren Schutz bittet. Ich durfte dieses Lied schon ein paar Mal hören und jedes Mal bekam ich Gänsehaut und hatte wirklich das Gefühl, dass der Raum sich mit einem speziellen Geist füllt.

Die hawaiianischen Geschichten sind sehr bildhaft und handeln natürlich oft von Tapferkeit und Liebe.

Hawaii – Culture

Polynesian roots

The Polynesian culture of the native Hawaiians fascinated me right from my first contact and I was trapped in admiration. It is so different from my European roots, but on the other side there are a lot of similarities with our pre-roman cultures. It’s based on the necessity to live in accord with mother nature and can teach us quite a lot in our time, where our technical progress has brought us to a point where we talk more and more about the global heating and climate change.

Hawai 006

For this post I diligently researched the net and found a lot of information on Wikipedia. My goal is to explain to you in my own words why I am so fascinated, but don’t want to tell you lies. The first thing you realize when starting to dive into this adventure is the fact that there are a lot of similarities between the cultures of the other South-Pacific Islands. This is taken as a proof that the first Hawaiians did arrive with their outrigger canoes from exactly those islands.

Hawai 038

Religion:

As I already explained in one of my posts, the Hawaiians didn’t know any letters. There are quite a few places to be found on the islands with petroglyphs, but most of what we know today has been transferred orally from generation to generation. This is why one of most favorite pastimes for Hawaiians is „Talk Story“. They sit together and and tell each other stories and legends of the past. I will post my favorites in one of my next posts. They are very pictorial and poetic.

But let’s start first with a description of the different gods, the Hawaiians worshiped.

There are 4 main male gods. Lono, a god of copiousness, who was also in charge of music. In his honor the Hawaiians celebrated every year the Makahiki festival. During one of those celebrations Captain Cook set foot on the islands for the first time. The legend has it that Lono descended from heaven to earth on a rainbow to get married to Laka. Another legend tells us that he is the one who -on the island of Moloka’i- brought the Hula to men. Ku was the husband of the goddess Hina. As a couple they united opposites in each other. He was the only one that got human offerings. Kane (this is at the same time also the word for man) was the creator of heaven and earth. He had a shell that transformed into a boat the minute it was placed on water. And then there is Kanaloa, the god of the ocean.

Hawai 008

A Banyan Tree, under these trees the Hawaiians used to meet

The four female goddesses are Hina, the wife of Ku, which was the mother of life. She incorporates all characteristics of a woman. Laka, the wife of Lono, stands for beauty and dance, and therefore for everything sensual in our life. Pele is the best known goddess on the islands today. She is in charge of fire and the volcanoes. Actually she’s a rather nice lady, but if you get her mad, she let’s the earth rumble and the volcanoes spit fire. Legend has it that she lived on Maui’s Haleakala from where she was ousted and found refuge on the summit of Mauna Loa on the island of Hawai’i. Somebody must have made her real mad, since she’s spitting fire alongside the Kilauea since 1983 without taking a break. Finally there is Kapo, a sister of Pele. She is a dreaded witch that catches men and doesn’t treat them too nicely. A real maneater.

A very important part of the religion is Mana. Mana means first of all power, but it stands also for a strong energy, force and self-confidence. A old legend says, that the bigger your body, the more Mana it can accumulate. Therefore it was wise to be somewhat overweight. Since even your shadow is able to collect Mana there was a Kapu (taboo) that forbade regular people to step onto the shadow of a Ali’i (aristocrats). If you broke this rule you were sentenced to death.

The word Kapu even found it’s way in our language (English and German). It stands for a very strict prohibition. Kapu’s were invented by the Kings and could only be lifted by them. For example there was a Kapu that forbade men and women to eat together, a part from being on a canoe on the ocean. And women were not allowed to eat pork, turtles, bananas or coconuts. But even after breaking one of those Kapus you were entitled to a second chance. You were brought to a sacred place like Pu’uhonua O Honaunau Historical Park on the island of Hawai’i.

Hawai 122

This is actual my favorite place on the islands. Today you can see an old Heiau (temple) and an original Hawaiian village. A convict was brought to the opposite side of the bay and had to swim through it. If he made it, he was a free man. But there were the best warriors and some unfriendly animals in the water to make it not too easy.

I am not much of a mystic believer, but when I came to this place for the first time on a very early morning I felt a very strong spiritual force in that place. There is a lot of Mana flowing. At night you are supposed to meat „night marchers“ here. These are the spirits of dead warriors that still walk the earth at special places. From what I was told they are usually harmless, but you shouldn’t risk to stand in their way. I know a lady with a lot of Hawaiian blood in her veins, that assured me that she has met those guys once. I myself am not very keen on meeting them.

That much for today. I will write more about this in a later post.